An in depth look at the cleft lip and plate facial defects

Cleft lip and cleft palate are openings or splits in the upper lip, the roof of the mouth palate or both. There is some evidence that babies born to obese women may have increased risk of cleft lip and palate.

Children who are judged as attractive tend to be perceived as more intelligent, exhibit more positive social behaviors, and are treated more positively than children with cleft lip or cleft palate.

There is no way to prevent a cleft palate, but avoiding alcohol and tobacco during pregnancy can reduce the chance of a cleft and other problems. Cleft lip and cleft palate may also occur as a result of exposure to viruses or chemicals while the fetus is developing in the womb.

Researchers believe that most cases of cleft lip and cleft palate are caused by an interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The opening in the lip can be a small slit or it can be a large opening that goes through the lip into the nose.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC estimate that, in the United States, around 2, infants are born with a cleft palate, and 4, babies are born with a cleft lip, either with or without a cleft palate. Some children have a cleft lip or cleft palate because of changes in their genes.

Cleft Palate The roof of the mouth is called the "palate. Children with cleft lip or palate tend to have more problems with their teeth than other children, because the alveolar ridge, which is the ridge of bone that supports the upper teeth and gums, might not develop properly.

These teams usually consist of experienced and qualified physicians and health care providers from different specialties. They gradually move towards each other, and they join, or fuse, at the mouth and nose to form the skull. Treatment A range of interventions is available for children born with a cleft.

They most commonly occur as isolated birth defects but are also associated with many inherited genetic conditions or syndromes. Cleft lip may be unilateral or bilateral. Recently, CDC reported on important findings from research studies about some factors that increase the chance of having a baby with an orofacial cleft: For example, a deficiency of B vitamins such as folic acidan excess of vitamin A, and exposure of the fetus to alcohol, radiation or noxious chemicals can increase the possibility of facial clefts.

Adolescent boys typically deal with issues relating to withdrawal, attention, thought, and internalizing problems, and may possibly develop anxiousness-depression and aggressive behaviors.

If the child has a higher risk of ear infections because of their cleft palate, then tympanostomy tubes may be placed to prevent fluid from building up in the middle ear.

Facial tissue depths in children with cleft lip and palate.

Among some 15 types of clefting that affect the mouth and face, known as orofacial clefting, cleft lip and cleft palate account for between 50 percent and 80 percent of deformities experienced, depending on the type.

Normally, the tissues that make up the lip and palate fuse together in the second and third months of pregnancy. This causes the palate roof of the mouth or the lips to improperly join together leaving a hole or cleft.

Prevention After a baby is born with a cleft, parents are understandably concerned about the possibility of having another child with the same condition. A cleft lip happens if the tissue that makes up the lip does not join completely before birth.

Clefting results when there is not enough tissue in the mouth or lip area, and the tissue that is available does not join together properly. In addition, children with cleft palate often have an alveolar ridge defect.

Experts conclude that this is probably due to the associated stigma of visible deformities and possible speech impediments. There is some evidence that women diagnosed with diabetes before pregnancy may have an increased risk of having a baby with a cleft lip with or without a cleft palate.

Additional surgeries may be performed to improve the appearance of the lip and nose, close openings between the mouth and nose, help breathing, and stabilize and realign the jaw. With treatment, most children with orofacial clefts do well and lead a healthy life.

Facts about Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

The biologic mechanisms of mutual recognition of the two cabinets, and the way they are glued together, are quite complex and obscure despite intensive scientific research. In any case of clefting, the resulting appearance is one of distortion and disarray, while the function of the affected tissues is severely compromised.

Parent-to-parent support groups can prove to be useful for families of babies with birth defects of the head and face, such as orofacial clefts. They are the most common of the developmental deformities to afflict humankind. Surgery to repair a cleft palate is recommended within the first 18 months of life or earlier if possible.

Females are more likely to have a cleft palate only. Children with cleft lip or cleft palate may also have trouble speaking. If you have a family history of cleft lip and cleft palate, tell your doctor before you become pregnant. Because the lip and the palate develop separately, it is possible to have a cleft lip without a cleft palate, a cleft palate without a cleft lip, or both together.

Understandably we have the same aspirations for our children: A defect in the alveolus can 1 displace, tip, or rotate permanent teeth2 prevent permanent teeth from appearing, and 3 prevent the alveolar ridge from forming. They also might have ear infections, hearing loss, and problems with their teeth.

A tympanostomy tube, or pressure equalization PE tube, used to be known as a "grommet.Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is a craniofacial malformation affecting more than seven million people worldwide that results in defects of the hard palate, teeth, maxilla, nasal spine and floor, and maxillodental asymmetry.

CLP facial soft-tissue depth (FSTD) values have never been published. Cleft lip and cleft palate are openings or splits in the upper lip, the roof of the mouth (palate) or both. Cleft lip and cleft palate result when facial structures that are developing in an unborn baby don't close completely.

Cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common birth defects. Common Craniofacial Anomalies: Facial Clefts and Encephaloceles Jeremy A.

Hunt, F.R.A.C.S., and P. Craig Hobar, M.D. American Cleft Palate Association3 grouped craniofacial disorders according to their di-verse causes, anatomical features, and treat- The cleft lip produced with medial nasomax. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that, in the United States, around 2, infants are born with a cleft palate, and 4, babies are born with a cleft lip, either with or without a cleft palate.

A cleft is one of the most common types of birth defects in the US. The cleft can affect one or both sides of the face.

Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

A cleft lip and/or palate presents many challenges: Difficulty feeding. While an infant with a cleft lip might have no difficulty breastfeeding, a cleft palate might make it impossible to suck or swallow.

Susceptibility to middle ear infections. A cleft palate can anatomically affect the drainage of the. Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby’s lip or mouth do not form properly during pregnancy.

Together, these birth defects commonly are called “orofacial clefts”. This joining of tissue forms the facial features, like the lips and mouth.

A cleft lip happens if the tissue that makes up the lip does not join.

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An in depth look at the cleft lip and plate facial defects
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